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Biden Biden Cartel Commentary Economy Food Government Overreach Lies Links from other news sources.

Biden blames everyone but himself for the high prices. Now it’s grocery stores.

Views: 23

Biden blames everyone but himself for the high prices. Now it’s grocery stores. At a dinner in South Carolina, Biden again turned around and blamed another group for high prices. The grocery stores.

So now will we see the DOJ send out the FBI to arrest store owners for his bad policies? He keeps on saying how inflation is coming down. Here’s a comparison. first. Inflation hits 10% then comes down to 8 then 7 then 5%. Lower right?

You gain 10lbs. then 8 then 7 then 5. You brag that you brought your weight gain down to 5 lbs. But now you’re 30 lbs. heavier. So, what cost $100.00 now costs how much? Do the math.

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Commentary Food Government Overreach Links from other news sources.

What did you think would happen? California farm workers make less with overtime law.

Views: 11

What did you think would happen? California farm workers make less with overtime law. A law took effect back in 2019 that put the farm workers on overtime pay. It passed in 2016. As it was phased it the idea was to have the farm workes make more money. But did it work?

A recent  study showed that some of the workers were making from 100 to 200 dollars less a week. Why? Many farmworkers are not working overtime and their take-home pay has decreased as a result of employers reducing hours.

“We have an option to keep fighting for an agricultural economy in which workers are treated with dignity and have a real say,” said Antonio De Loera-Brust, communications director for UFW.

De Loera-Brust conceded the union has heard from workers who have had their hours cut, but emphasized that employers are the ones making the schedules. He also acknowledged that retailers continue to raise prices, which creates a “horrible race to the bottom” that hurts growers and workers.

 

 

 

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Commentary Food History Links from other news sources. Reprints from others.

Meet the American who gave us Nashville hot chicken, Thornton Prince, man of many passions. Blistering culinary trend boasts salacious origin story of jilted lovers, revenge, steamy oil and fried chicken

Views: 9

Meet the American who gave us Nashville hot chicken, Thornton Prince, man of many passions.

Blistering culinary trend boasts salacious origin story of jilted lovers, revenge, steamy oil and fried chicken

By Kerry J. Byrne Fox News

Variety, they say, is the spice of life.

Tennessee tastemaker Thornton Prince was living proof.

A legendary local lothario in early 20th-century Nashville, Prince possessed an appetite for fried chicken — and the ladies.

His passions have made him a legend in American culinary circles.

Prince is the king of Nashville hot chicken.

 

A blistering food trend across the United States today, Nashville hot chicken comes with a bawdy origin story as hot and spicy as the steamy oil used to bathe Prince’s poultry.

“He was a loving man and he wasn’t bad on the eyes either,” great-grandniece, family historian and Los Angeles hot chicken chef Kim Prince told Fox News Digital.

Nashville hot chicken icon

“Tall, good-looking and handsome,” Thornton Prince is considered the father of Nashville hot chicken. A spurned lover sought revenge by serving him chicken doused with powerful spices — but Prince loved it so much he went into business selling fried chicken bathed in cayenne pepper oil. (Courtesy Kim Prince/Prince Family)

Born outside Nashville three decades after the Civil War, Prince was gifted with knee-buckling good looks, penetrating eyes, a lean build, a winning smile and a charismatic personality, by all accounts.

Women loved him. And he loved them back.

He was married five times and dallied with many other ladies along the way, according to sources.

“He was a loving man and he wasn’t bad on the eyes either.” — Kim Prince

One of those spurned lovers, according to oft-told lore, sought revenge by spicing up Prince’s favorite fried chicken — secretly, of course — with an intolerable amount of cayenne pepper.

Prince got the last teary-eyed laugh. The pig farmer, jack of all trades and man of many passions loved the rocket-fueled fried chicken.

He began selling it out of his home, fried in lard in deep cast-iron pots, just before or during the Great Depression.

He and his brothers eventually opened a restaurant, the legendary BBQ Chicken Shack, around the time of World War II. (There are conflicting reports about the actual year.)

Nashville hot chicken

A Nashville hot chicken sandwich at Party Fowl. The Music City is also a poultry paradise, as Nashville hot chicken, a longstanding local tradition, has captured the attention of food lovers across the nation.  (Kerry J. Byrne/Fox News Digital)

The scorned lady friend has been lost to history, known in hot-chicken coops of gossip today as “Girlfriend X.”

The story sounds too contrived and salacious to be true — as if born out of steamy southern-fried fiction, complete with mysterious vengeful lover.

Yet the story is the real deal, said Nashville native and historian Rachel Louise Martin, author of the 2021 book, “Hot, Hot Chicken: A Nashville Story.”

“The man really got himself around. He really was married all those times,” Martin told Fox News Digital.

Metal sign Nashville hot chicken

Nashville hot chicken, and the signs and smells of it, are ubiquitous in the Tennessee city. (Kerry J. Byrne/Fox News Digital)

“He had multiple other girlfriends and there were several angry women in his past who might have tried to teach him a lesson.”

Thornton Prince, it turns out, may have cheated one of those women not once, but twice.

Grandson of a slave

Thornton James Prince was born near Franklin, Tennessee, on an unknown day in December 1892, according to records uncovered by historian Martin.

His parents, Thornton and Mary (Maury) Prince, were born in the years immediately after the Civil War. At least one grandparent, his maternal grandmother, Ann Currine, was an enslaved cook on the land in which her culinary legend grandson was born.

Nashville hot chicken

Nashville hot chicken traces its roots to Thornton Prince (far right, standing), seen here in a 1916 family photo. Prince was around 24 years old at the time.  (Courtesy Kim Prince/Prince Family)

“He was tall, good-looking and handsome,” Prince’s grandniece, Andre Prince Jeffries, told Fox News Digital.

Known around Nashville as Miss Andre today, she took over the original BBQ Chicken Shack in 1980 and renamed it Prince’s Hot Chicken “to recognize the family.”

Prince’s Hot Chicken now has multiple locations and is revered as the true taste of original Nashville hot-chicken. It has become in recent years a destination for culinary tourists from around the world.

“There were several angry women in his past who might have tried to teach him a lesson.” — Rachel Louise Martin

Miss Andre is old enough to remember the Prince of poultry.

“He was pleasant to look at. I remember that even when he was an old man and I was child. He had beautiful white hair and he was jolly, just like Santa Claus. He was full of laughs,” said Miss Andre.

She’s become a Nashville legend and de facto ambassador of the Music City’s southern hospitality and hot chicken history.

Nashville hot chicken

Prince’s Hot Chicken of Nashvile is operated by Andre Prince Jeffries, the grandniece of Nashville hot chicken icon Thornton Prince.  (Kerry J. Byrne/Fox News Digital)

Prince was born into a culture in which chicken played an essential role, stemming from an era when poultry was the only livestock slaves could own.

“Often called the preacher’s bird or the gospel fowl, echoing its sacred role among West Africans, slaves and their descendants laid the foundation for America’s love with the chicken that is now spreading around the world,” historian Andrew Lawler wrote in his 2014 book, “Why Did the Chicken Cross the World? The Epic Saga of the Bird That Powers Civilization.”

 

Girlfriend X provided the entrepreneurial Prince with an exciting new way to enjoy the common chicken dinner.

“Nashville hot chicken needs two things. Great Southern fried chicken and it needs to be dunked in hot melted spice,” Brian Morris, executive chef of Hattie B’s Hot Chicken, said in a promotional video for the 11-year-old Nashville chicken chain.

Hot chicken hotspot Hattie B's

Hattie B’s Hot Chicken was founded in 2012. It quickly proved a popular tourist destination for fans of spicy poultry while helping popularize the Music City specialty around the nation. Hattie B’s now has six locations in and around Nashville and six more around the country.  (Kerry J. Byrne/Fox News Digital)

He calls it a “whirlpool of love with a touch of heat.”

The basic formula is the same at every hot-chicken hotspot. But the spice mixture can vary dramatically from location to location — and to create different levels of heat.

“Nashville hot chicken needs two things. Great Southern fried chicken and it needs to be dunked in hot melted spice” — Chef Brian Morris, Hattie B’s

“The Prince recipe we hold closely to death,” said great-grandniece Kim Prince, who still speaks with her Tennessee accent despite living and working in Los Angeles, where she serves the family’s original recipe under the name Hotville Chicken.

“We’ve always wanted to tell the story,” she added, “in our own Prince family twang.”

Nashville hot chicken ‘ours and ours alone’

The story of Nashville hot chicken was, for at least a half century, told only in that Prince family Tennessee twang — and known only in the black Nashville neighborhoods served by the BBQ Chicken Shack as it moved from location to location.

Nashville hot chicken’s dramatic rise as a national phenomenon has unfolded suddenly here in the 21st century — perhaps not coincidentally with Nashville’s recent explosion as one of the fastest-growing cities in America.

Nashville hot chicken

Nashville hot chicken joints serve spicy chicken in every way imaginable, from traditional sauce-soaked fried chicken breasts to these deadly hot dry-rubbed wings from Bolton’s Spicy Chicken and Fish in East Nashville. (Kerry J. Byrne/Fox News Digital)

The city’s population has grown more than 20% over the past decade, just as hot chicken gained national and now international prestige.

Author Martin witnessed the rise of Nashville hot chicken in the blink of an education.

The Nashville native left the sleepy Music City for college in 2006 — having never heard of its namesake piquant poultry.

 

She returned after graduate school in 2013 to a booming city filled with newcomers from across the country seeking mild winters and affordable prices and where, Martin said, “everybody was talking about hot chicken.”

Local poultry pundits credit its national ascension to the first Nashville Hot Chicken Festival, held in 2006.

hot chicken historian

Nashville native Rachel Louise Martin is the author of the 2021 book, “Hot, Hot Chicken: A Nashville Story.” (Courtesy Rachel Louise Martin)

A wave of glitzy new hot chicken eateries soon opened in its wake, often well-funded with marketing budgets the Prince family never had.

Hattie B’s opened in 2012 and now boasts six locations in and around Nashville and six more around the country, including Las Vegas.

Party Fowl opened in 2014 and has six locations, mostly in Tennessee.

“Please wash your hands before rubbing your eyes or your babies.” — Warning at Bolton’s Spicy Chicken and Fish

Hot chicken is now served at breakfast, lunch and dinner across Nashville, and has found its way onto the menu at sports bars and high-end dining spots.

Party Fowl offers hot chicken Cuban sandwiches, hot chicken tacos and hot chicken queso, among many other choices.

East Nashville hot chicken spot

Bolton’s Spicy Chicken and Fish in East Nashville is one of the oldest hot-chicken eateries in the city. It is famous for serving perhaps the hottest hot chicken in America. (Kerry J. Byrne/Fox News Digital)

Bolton’s Spicy Chicken and Fish, a no-frills cinder-block hut in East Nashville, opened in the 1980s.

It’s a beloved local landmark and one of the few eateries in town that served hot chicken before it was cool. Bolton’s offers what many believe is the hottest chicken in town — in any town.

“Please wash your hands before rubbing your eyes or your babies,” warns a sign above the order window.

 

Hot chicken now defines the Music City in ways even its traditional American tunes and songwriters have not.

“Nashville is also the home of country music. But nobody calls it Nashville country music,” former mayor Bill Purcell told Fox News Digital.

Kim Prince

Los Angeles chef Kim Prince, great grandniece of Nashville hot chicken patriarch Thornton Prince, sells the family’s original-recipe hot chicken in Southern California as Hotville Chicken. (Courtesy Kim Prince)

“But they do call it Nashville hot chicken. It’s the only indigenous food in the city. The only food invented here and nowhere else.”

Nashville hot chicken, Purcell beamed, “Is ours and ours alone.”

Search for Girlfriend X

Thornton Prince died of cerebral thrombosis on Feb. 15, 1960. He was 67 years old.

He’s buried at Boyd Cemetery in Franklin, Tennessee, said Kim Prince, not far from where he was born and where his grandmother once lived in bondage.

Thornton Prince

Thornton Prince is considered the father of Nashville hot chicken. His legend has grown in recent years as Nashville hot chicken has emerged as a nationwide phenomenon. (Courtesy Kim Prince/Prince Family)

Nashville hot chicken is served coast to coast, adopted by entrepreneurs far removed from Tennessee.

Dave’s Hot Chicken, based in California, was founded in 2017. It’s opened nearly 100 hot chicken eateries from Hollywood to Times Square in the six years since.

“I don’t think there’s been any new category in the food business that’s created more excitement over the years than hot chicken.” — Dave’s Hot Chicken CEO Bill Phelps

The newest Dave’s Hot Chicken opens Friday (Oct. 20) in Massachusetts.

“I don’t think there’s been any new category in the food business that’s created more excitement over the years than hot chicken,” Dave’s Hot Chicken CEO Bill Phelps told Fox News Digital last year.

Hot chicken purists, including members of the Prince family, recognize that their poultry patriarch did not invent what’s now a nationwide phenomenon.

Nashville hot chicken icons Andre Prince Jeffries and former Mayor Bill Purcell. Jeffries is the owner of Prince’s Hot Chicken, the originator of the piquant poultry, and Purcells helped popularize the local  specialty with the founding of the Nashville Hot Chicken Festival. (Courtesy Bill Purcell)

That honor belongs to mysterious Girlfriend X.

Historian Martin identifies five women in “Hot, Hot Chicken: A Nashville Story” linked to romances with Prince, one of whom she believes is the true but unwitting inventor of an all-American taste treasure.

 

Caroline Bridges, Gertrude Claybrook, Mattie Crutcher, Mattie Hicks and Jennie May Patton, each long deceased, are the likely double-crossed lovers who would have been tempted to seek revenge via hot chicken on the insatiable Prince.

Nashville hot chicken

Nashville hot chicken sandwich from Party Fowl in Nashville’; hot chicken patriarch Thornton Prince. (Kerry J. Byrne/Fox News Digital/Kim Prince/Prince Family)

Purcell, the hot chicken enthusiast and former mayor, believes the final chapter in the Nashville hot chicken story is still to be written.

“The woman who first cooked the chicken, Girlfriend X, is lost to history,” Purcell said. “But she did indeed invent this thing.”

Kerry J. Byrne is a lifestyle reporter with Fox News Digital.

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America's Heartland Food Links from other news sources. Reprints from others. Uncategorized Work Place

Popular “All-American” Companies That Are Now Internationally Owned.

Views: 29

Popular “All-American” Companies That Are Now Internationally Owned.

By Lauren Christina.

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Back Door Power Grab Corruption Economy Food Government Overreach How sick is this? Links from other news sources. Opinion Politics Reprints from others.

Ice Cream Truck Owners Revolt Against Democrats’ Ridiculous Crack Down.

Views: 22

Ice Cream Truck Owners Revolt Against Democrats’ Ridiculous Crack Down.

Ice cream truck owners aren’t happy with Democrats in New York City who propose a new policy that would force truck owners to ditch their fuel-powered generators and use “climate-friendly alternatives.”

The eco-friendly proposal has been slammed as “ridiculous.” Truck owners warn it will have a devastating impact on their companies.

Appearing on Fox News, Ice Cream Emergency owner Ed Lachterman said, “You can’t even have solar in a home if you have trees that are too tall. How are you going to drive around the city and have a solar-powered truck in the concrete jungle?” Lachterman asked. (POLL: Is Joe Biden Fit to be President? Results Are In…)

“It’s just ridiculous. You’re going to have product costs going through the roof trying to convert something is crazy, and if you go battery, I’ll need something twice as long to hold the batteries to run it,” he added.

“We’d probably have to raise our prices,” Lachterman’s wife Carol said.

“This guy is trying to put a law based on his agenda without thinking of anything, without thinking of the consequences, and that’s not what you’re in office to do,” Lachterman said.

“You’re there to help your constituents and to say, ‘Oh, well, we’re going to just start banning things,’ all they’re going to do is put people out of work, make the economy worse and just really destroy everything that we’re trying to build up.”

“Brooklyn Councilman Lincoln Restler introduced the proposal last week that would force ice cream trucks to ditch their fuel-powered generators for more climate-friendly alternatives over the course of the next three years,” the report said. (Trending: Disney Just Pulled A Bud Light…)

“Ice cream truck operators would be forced to rely on solar-powered or electric-powered machines, which could cost companies thousands, according to the New York Post,” the report added.

The New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has created new rules that would require pizzerias with coal and wooden-fire ovens installed prior to 2016 to cut carbon emissions by 75%.

“They’re trying to go after your gasoline water heaters, your gas stoves… The sad thing is it’s an attack on the hospitality industry, which is one of the biggest employers in New York City,” Lachterman said. “New York is not going to have to worry about businesses because everyone’s going to move out. You can’t operate under these conditions.”

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Back Door Power Grab Commentary Economy Food Government Overreach Leftist Virtue(!) Life Reprints from others. WOKE

13 Nations agree to engineer global FAMINE by destroying agriculture, saying that producing food is BAD for the planet!

Views: 55

We are now being told that producing food is bad for the planet. To “save” the planet, globalists insist, farms must be shut down across the globe.

A family with starving children, Wikimedia Commons.

Under the guise of reducing “methane emissions,” thirteen nations have signed a pledge to engineer global famine by gutting agricultural production and shutting down farms. Announced earlier this year by the Global Methane Hub — a cabal of crisis engineers who exploit public panic to destroy the world food supply — those thirteen nations are:

Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Chile, Czech Republic, Ecuador, Germany, Panama, Peru, Spain, the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, and Uruguay.

Imagine no meat production from Australia, Brazil and the USA. This is the goal of the globalists. And they admit it’s all part of the climate fraud which has been thoroughly exposed as a quack science hoax, by the way. As Luis Planas, Spain’s Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food says, “I am glad to see the shared commitment by the international community to mitigate methane emissions from agriculture as a means to achieve the goals we signed for in the Paris Agreement on climate.”

“Food systems are responsible for 60% of methane emissions,” warns Marcelo Mena, CEO of the Global Methane Hub. She is saying that farming is destroying the planet. Hence, their demand to shut down farms. Without farms, you have no food. And without food, you get exactly what Kamala Harris called for over the weekend: “Reduced population.”

The depopulation agenda is no longer even a secret. They are bragging about it.

And here’s their logic: FOOD = GLOBAL WARMING. So they are attacking food and shutting it down.

Starving child in Africa.

Cows and chickens to be replaced by crickets and insect larvae

Enjoy the crunchy fake meat patties and Cricket McNuggets. Soon, you’ll be eating bugs because meat will be wildly unaffordable due to the governments shutting down farms and ranches. As journalist Leo Hohmann explains:

We can presume from this language that among the practices being considered are replacing a major portion of the beef and dairy cattle, pork and chicken stocks that populations rely on for protein with insect larvae, meal worms, crickets, etc. The U.N., World Economic Forum and other NGOs have been promoting meatless diets and the consumption of insect protein for years, and billionaires have invested in massive insect factories being built in the state of Illinois, in Canada and in the Netherlands, where meal worms, crickets and other bugs will be processed as additives to be inserted into the food supply, often without clear labels that will inform people of exactly what they are eating.

Hohmann also refers to the Deagel forecast which projects an almost 70 percent reduction of the U.S. population by 2025, saying:

There is no more efficient way to depopulate than through war, famine and plagues. Isn’t it interesting that all three of these time-tested methods of murder are in play right now?

In a related story, Michael Snyder from The Economic Collapse Blog writes:

Global food supplies just keep getting even tighter, and global hunger has risen to extremely alarming levels… According to the United Nations, nearly 30 percent of the global population does not have constant access to food right now, and there are approximately 900 million people that are facing “severe food insecurity”…

Chinese children starving.

Gee, add to that the next global PLANdemic, and you can see (if you take off your leftist blinders) where this is headed. And the BIDEN REGIME is particpating in it!–TPR

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COVID Food Links from other news sources.

Leftists Furious at In-N-Out After Company Reveals New Policy, Demand Boycott.

Views: 61

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

Leftists Furious at In-N-Out After Company Reveals New Policy, Demand Boycott. Music to my ears.

Conservatives have engaged in a very successful boycott of Bud Light over the company’s blatant political agenda, but now it looks like the left has found its own boycott target after famed fast food giant In-N-Out Burger has made them mad.

The fast food giant has garnered the ire of the left by telling employees that the coronavirus crisis is over and there is no longer a reason to wear masks in the workplace.

Frankly, why shouldn’t the burger behemoth? There are no reputable studies that show masking prevents the transmission of viruses. Masks just don’t work.

Leftist Dr. Lucky Tran was incensed enough to start a massive Twitter thread in which he wailed about the burger company and urged his leftist followers to attack them with tweets and messages on the company’s websites.

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Food History Leftist Virtue(!) Media Woke Progressive Racism WOKE

Gimme a break: Cracker Barrel Is Under Fire for Its “Racist” Name

Views: 62

Story by Gina Vaynshteyn

The comfort food-style restaurant chain Cracker Barrel, known for its overwhelming amount of ornamental knick-knacks and vintage signs plastered on the walls, is in some social media trouble today. Folks on the internet are claiming Cracker Barrel is racist.

What’s the meaning behind Cracker Barrel?

According to Southern Living, “cracker-barrel” was coined in 1916 because of barrels containing soda crackers — a popular item for sale at country stores. Customers at said country stores would hang around the barrels as a kind of ritual (kind of like the trope of employees gossiping near the water cooler). The first Cracker Barrel location opened in 1969 in Lebanon, Tenn., and it derived its name from the cracker-barrel community experience back in the day.

According to Dictionary.com, “cracker-barrel” means “of or suggesting the simple rustic informality and directness thought to be characteristic of life in and around the country store.”

But some Twitter users have also pointed out that the term “cracker” might have another, more racist connotation. According to NPR, the term “cracker” was used in the mid-18th century to refer to poor white people in states like Maryland, Virginia, and Georgia.

“It is suspected that it was a shortened version of ‘whip-cracker,’ since the manual labor they did involved driving livestock with a whip,” historian Jelani Cobb told the outlet.

But in the late 1800s, writers from the northern USA region referred to some southerners as “crackers.”

Oh, Please!

“[Those writers] decided that they were called that because of the cracking of the whip when they drove slaves,” historian Dana Ste. Claire told the outlet, though he noted those the term would be applied to weren’t typically wealthy enough to own slaves.

Users on Twitter also claimed that a “cracker barrel” was the barrel used to hold whips, though there is currently no historical evidence to back up that claim. [See the above screenshot from a Twitter post.]

Back in 2015, someone named Ryan Koch, who lived in Iowa, started a petition to change its name because he believed Cracker Barrel to be “racist” toward white folks. Per the Change.org petition, Koch wrote, “I say all European Americans start protesting C****er Barrel. It uses an offensive slur, and it is deeply offensive and mocks our long and proud heritage.” He later clarified the post was “satire.” Ummmmm, OK.

In a tweet, one user claimed you can even see a whip in the logo, going from the first R in “barrel” to the K in “cracker.”

While it’s currently unclear whether or not there is any historical evidence to that claim, the company has since removed the connecting line from the R to the K in the logo.

Cracker Barrel’s PR team reportedly told Pop Icon that the logo was meant to “invoke nostalgia,” and was inspired by “an older gentleman who sat on the front porch during the summer.”

Has Cracker Barrel ever been racist?

So, while it seems like the name of Cracker Barrel isn’t inherently racist, it sounds like a lot of Black customers have experienced racism at the restaurant locations, which is horrifying.

In 2004, there was a filing and settlement of a racial discrimination lawsuit against Cracker Barrel after finding evidence of racist behavior and discrimination in at least 50 locations across the U.S. According to CBS News, 21 people filed a $100 million federal lawsuit against the chain. At the time, a spokesperson for Cracker Barrel stated, “ Our mission is pleasing people, and that means all people. We do not tolerate discrimination of any kind.”However, evidence suggests that Cracker Barrel definitely knew what was happening and wasn’t doing anything about it. Attorney David Sanford stated, “It can’t be the case that Cracker Barrel doesn’t know about it. We have enough evidence right now to suggest that Cracker Barrel, to the very highest level, is responsible.”

According to CBS News, the lawsuit includes statements from Black customers who stated they were forced to wait while white customers were seated right away. One specific person said that she arrived at Cracker Barrel at 9:48 p.m. and was told that she couldn’t be served because the restaurant was about to close. However, she then saw four white men were allowed in. “We had hungry children, and he still refused to serve us,” the person said.

“There are perhaps thousands more African-Americans who have been denied service, treated rudely by servers and hosts, and subjected to racial slurs at Cracker Barrel restaurants,” attorney Grant Morris said.

Hopefully, the chain learned from their (sic) mistakes and has implemented a zero-tolerance policy among their (sic) staff. Nobody deserves to go to a restaurant and be discriminated against — period.

If you are looking for ways to donate your time or money to Black Lives Matter and other antiracist organizations, we have created a list of resources to get you started. [bolded in original]


Well, that last paragraph lets you know where this clueless white woman who posted this on DISTRACTIFY stands on the political spectrum.

It would seem she is so far gone that she doesn’t proofread her articles before submitting them. A number of commas are missing and misusing their for its. I left those in with the notation hat they are in the original.

Chapman is located 30 miles from LA. A private Liberal Arts school.

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Food Links from other news sources.

Pampering Chickens cost Californians over $7.00 a dozen.

Views: 35

Pampering Chickens cost Californians over $7.00 a dozen. So what’s next? Air conditioning in the summer and heat in the winter? I was upset when a dozen of eggs cost $2.89 last week. But compared to California that’s dirt cheap.

The average retail price for a dozen large eggs jumped to $7.37 in California this week, up from $4.83 at the beginning of December and just $2.35 at this time last year, data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture show. This is being blamed on the bird flu.

Beside price gouging, I think cage free is another reason. In Ohio I saw that the cage free eggs are $3.99 average. This time last year eggs were $2.35 in California. Ohio $.098. You tell me why we see the big difference.

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Food Links from other news sources. Reprints from others. Uncategorized

Cookbook looks back at dynamic Popeyes founder and his food. Dedication to my dear friend.

Views: 22

I found this in my local newspaper and right away I thought of Popeye’s number one customer and fan. I lovingly admire him for his ability to put down that fried chicken.

FILE – Popeyes founder Al Copeland holds a piece of his fried chicken outside one of his 34 fast food outlets in New Orleans on June 20, 1979. A new book, “Secrets of a Tastemaker: Al Copeland, The Cookbook,” released last month, helped mark the 50th anniversary of Popeyes Famous Fried Chicken. (AP Photo, File)
FILE – A chicken sandwich is displayed at a Popeyes fast food restaurant in Kyle, Texas, on Aug. 22, 2019. A new book, “Secrets of a Tastemaker: Al Copeland, The Cookbook,” released last month, helped mark the 50th anniversary of Popeyes Famous Fried Chicken. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

Louisiana is known for delivering food with big, bold flavor. The same can be said for the founder of the Popeyes fried chicken empire, who put spicy chicken, red beans and dirty rice on the national map and whose story is outlined in a new book, “Secrets of a Tastemaker: Al Copeland, The Cookbook.”

Copeland’s son Al Copeland Jr. said he and authors Chris Rose and Kit Wohl tried to capture the “real life and times of Al Copeland” in the book released last month.

FILE - Popeyes founder Al Copeland holds a piece of his fried chicken outside one of his 34 fast food outlets in New Orleans on June 20, 1979. A new book, “Secrets of a Tastemaker: Al Copeland, The Cookbook," released last month, helped mark the 50th anniversary of Popeyes Famous Fried Chicken. (AP Photo, File)

Popeyes founder Al Copeland in New Orleans in 1979. (AP Photo, File)

This photo provided by Foxglove Communications shows Al Copeland Jr. with his cookbook "Secrets of a Tastemaker: Al Copeland, The Cookbook." (Sam Hanna/Foxglove Communications via AP)
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This photo provided by Foxglove Communications shows Al Copeland Jr. with his cookbook “Secrets of a Tastemaker: Al Copeland, The Cookbook.” (Sam Hanna/Foxglove Communications via AP)

FILE - Popeyes founder Al Copeland holds a piece of his fried chicken outside one of his 34 fast food outlets in New Orleans on June 20, 1979. A new book, “Secrets of a Tastemaker: Al Copeland, The Cookbook," released last month, helped mark the 50th anniversary of Popeyes Famous Fried Chicken. (AP Photo, File)

Popeyes founder Al Copeland in New Orleans in 1979. (AP Photo, File)

The elder Copeland, who died in 2008, made his mark in business with his restaurants, but was also known for philanthropic endeavors — including “Secret Santa” missions to thousands of children in metro New Orleans and the extravagant Christmas light display at his home. For a time, he even had a successful offshore powerboat racing career.

“Some people thought he was flashy and flamboyant, and he was,” his son said in an interview with The Associated Press. “But what they didn’t know was that everything that was his was yours — whether that was a Lamborghini or just welcoming you into his home. He was very much a man who enjoyed seeing people happy.”

Copeland built — and eventually lost — the Popeyes fried chicken empire. His first restaurant opened 50 years ago, in 1972, in the New Orleans suburb of Arabi. The “Love That Chicken” jingle, still used in commercials today, debuted in 1980.

The book recounts Copeland’s boldness in cooking, and includes recipes — though not those associated with Popeyes, his son said. Readers can get a glimpse, he said, into the kind of food Al Copeland used in Copeland’s, the casual dining restaurant chain venture he started in 1983.

The book includes dishes served at the Copeland family table, including corn and crab bisque, crawfish bread, ricochet catfish, crawfish eggplant au gratin, and pork tenderloin CP3, named for then-New Orleans Hornets star guard Chris Paul.

“What runs throughout the book … is the story of the American dream,” Copeland Jr. said. “This book is about a guy who didn’t have much of anything, not much of an education and he was living in a world that wouldn’t give him much of a shot.”

By 1989, there were 700 Popeyes franchises in the United States and abroad, and Copeland leveraged those assets to buy the Church’s Fried Chicken chain. That move gave him control over 2,000 chicken restaurants. But the success was short-lived: A little more than two years later, the merged company had amassed more than $400 million in debt and, in 1991, Copeland filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection for Al Copeland Enterprises.

In May 1992, the bankruptcy court awarded Copeland’s creditors total control of his chicken empire under a new name, America’s Favorite Chicken Company. Copeland did retain ownership of the Popeyes recipes and the manufacturing company that made the seasonings, according to the book.

“Although he was not operating Popeyes, the company could not operate — not even exist — without him,” the book reads. “That ruling reinforced Al’s longtime belief that he should always have a back door, an alternative plan for change.”

In 2017, Restaurant Brands International Inc. acquired Popeyes.

Liz Williams, founder of the Southern Food and Beverage Museum in New Orleans, said Copeland was known for being bold, in thought and business.

“He has done almost more than any other chef to get the city’s most authentic flavors to people everywhere,” she said. “I think of him as an ambassador for New Orleans … because wherever there’s a Popeyes, then you have the chance to get a piece of New Orleans.”

The September book launch helped mark the 50th anniversary of Popeyes. Copeland Jr. said the fried chicken franchise was founded when he was 9 years old so he’s had a “chance to experience the whole ride from the poorer times to the exciting times.”

“This project is bringing back a lifetime of memories and it’s a way for my father’s legacy to live on,” he said.

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